Acculturation Among the Mishings                                                Page:45

 
Dr. Jatin
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Dr. Jatin
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(6)        Another significant change observed in the field is that some of the villagers have guest rooms in their houses. This is one of the  direct influence of the non tribal Assamese. As a member of the same community, the investigator has the  experience that few years back most of the Mishings villagers had no such  separate drawing rooms for the guests. The guests or the co-villagers have to  enter directly to the fire place for any sort of discussion. But now-a-days, a separate room, which is used as drawing room (guest room) is often seen in the  households.
Dress
        The dress of the Mishings can be divided into two distinct types as indicated by Roy (1966 : 74) in case of the tribes of Arunachal. The two distinct types are (i) general dress for everyday use, and (ii) special dress for festivals and ceremonial functions. As observed in the field, the dress for the everyday use of the people is very simple. The dress of the men is similar to non-tribal Assamese. A simple white dhoti (ugon) or sometimes a long coloured dumer (towel) and a shirt (galuk) is the dress of the men. The dress of the women is also simple, but divided into two pieces of garments. They generally wear a skirt (mosanam age) covering the part from the waist to the knee. The upper piece (gasong or gero) fastened above the breast falling along with the skirt. Occasionally, a blouse is seen to cover the upper part of the body.
            The dress for particular occasions is the special product of their loom. In these dresses, they use the mixture of various colours, e.g. red, black, green, yellow are common. On special occasions, a man wears a skirt (mibu galuk) over his usual dress and a dumer (towel) is a must. Only few of them use Paguri (turban). The dresses on special occasions are used in such a way, so that, a man will look like gam or leader. The dress of the women is same as they use daily, but the dresses for festivals and funcitons are more coloured and decorated. The plain dresses without colour and decoration are generally not used in festivals and rituals. Women are fond of various types of ornaments. Ear and neck ornaments (kentumaduli), chains (tadok), different type of bracelets (konge) are very much common among the women.
             All the dresses, especially of the women, are the products of loom. The Mishing women are famous for weaving in Assam. Few of their products, viz., gadu gasar, tapum gasar, dumer, mibu galuk, shekreg, neshag ri:bi are worth mentioning. The women use two types of looms. First is used like the Adis of Arunachal, one end fastened in a parallel bar (tututa) and the other end fastened in the waist. This type of loom can easily be used wherever they like in the cultivating field, inside the house as it is small and can be handled easily. Some of the products of this type of loom are gadu, mibu galuk and sogon. The other type is like the loom used by the non-tribal Assamese. Yarn for the loom is generally brought from the market. But the Mishing women, as found in the field, grow at least a little amount of cotton for their loom. This is done especially for gadu, which is a prestigious product, and which is offered as gift by a mother to her newly married son. Ginning and spinning is still done by the women themselves. The most striking feature of the Mishing women is that their weaving products are with pattern and colour of perfect taste.

                 


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