Acculturation Among the Mishings                                              Page:47

 
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         (4)  Few of the weaving productions, tapum gasor, gadu, dumer, mibu galuk etc. are sold by the women to meet the other daily needs.
         (5) Now-a-days, the clothes which are available in market are the most common dresses irrespective of male and female.

Tools and Implements
                 The villagers under study are essentially agriculturists. Therefore, all the implements of the villagers are agriculture oriented. It was observed in the field that only a few agricultural implements were used by the villagers. It was seen that all the agricultural implements were the direct influence of the non-tribal Assamese. As the Mishings were Jhum cultivators during the time of their habitation in the hills of Arunachal, they had only few agricultural tools. They were egin (bamboo baskets), epo, eging, kuyap (axes), dao or yoktung etc. After the migration to the plains of Assam, they accepted the method of wet cultivation and started to adopt the non-tribal Assamese way of cultivation. Nangal-juwali (plough), dila, moi, kashi etc., according to the aged villagers, are the gift of the Assamese culture to the Mishings.
                The people of the three villages possess cage-like baskets for pigs and fowls. They have separate type of cage-like baskets for each stage of pigs and fowls, viz. yegum, yegshup, yegpur-porog pekang, porog pera, porog peter. Their acquisitions from non-tribal Assamese are cowshed, buffaloshed, and numerous other domestic possessions. Few major tools for fishing, while the Mishings were in the hills of Arunachal, were e:opuk (bow and arrow) and few other arrow-type (jamborok) sharp-pointed tools. Trap-like porang, dingarang, jurki, jakoi etc. and varieties of nets (eshap), according to the villagers, are not their traditional possessions. These tools are the direct gift of the plains people of Assam.
                 As observed in the field, almost all the household utensils of the villagers are similar to those of the non-tribal Assamese. Now-a-days, it is rather difficult to find out the utensils which are of Mishing origin. Utensils like earthenware (ki:ling), aram-bati (metallic dishes) are not of their own origin and for these utensils they depend either on local potters or on the local market. The modern furniture like tables, chairs and utensils like cup, glass etc. are found in almost all households of the respondents under study. The modern tools and implements, now-a-days, are part and parcel of their life.
                It is, however, accepted by all the respondents that changes in all aspects of life is a phenomenon which cannot be resisted.

Case Study 5.8
            Shri Mohen Sarah (age - 45 years) of Mohmora, told that acculturation in respect    of these aspects was a must due to the time factor. The adjustment with the time   and situation was vital, and in doing so traditional dresses have been replaced by modern dresses and so also in other cases.
Case Study 5.9
           Both as a cultivator and Govt. employee Shri Lakheswar Kardong, aged 40 years   of Duhutimukh, is of the opinion that the pattern of their households should be   changed as their traditional houses are unhygienic. He said, "I am in favour of


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