The Field of  Study and Methodology                           Page :25

 
Dr. Jatin
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Dr. Jatin
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            The total area of the village Barpamua is 2680 bighas. The average size of land holding varies from 10 bighas to 20 bighas. There are no landless families in the village. There is no Namghar in the village and another Namghar, for the Bhagawatia villagers (another sect) is situated at a distance of one Kilometre from the village. The village is composed primarily of the Pagro sub-group of the Mishings.
Historical background of the Three Villages
      
      The three villages have historical background of their own. The Mishings have a habit of dwelling near the banks of the rivers. Naturally, they have to shift from one place to another due to flood, erosion and other natural calamities. The three villages under study are not the original villages. They have grown out of shifts and resettlements. The following are the accounts of the history and settlements of these villages as narrated by a few knowledgeable persons :
              According to Shri Brikuram Kumbang (age 55 years), the village Mohmora was situated in a small island of the Brahmaputra before 1950. The earthquake of 1950 had completely washed away the island and the villagers were compelled to shift from that place to the north bank of the river. They first shifted to Bahir Jonai in 1950 and stayed there for about three  years. They shifted again from Bahir Jonai to Mohmora in 1954 and since then have been living at the present site of the village. According to Shri Jobalung Doley, another villager, the island, at that time, was regarded as the boundary between the NEFA and Assam. Shri Doley informed that the name Mohmora (place of the death of buffalos) was given by the villagers when a number of buffalos died due to unknown diseases during the course of their migration to the present village. Since then, the village is known as Mohmora. Some other villagers informed that one-fourth of the co-villagers migrated from different places to this village in search of economic security. The migrations and re-settlements are still continuing in the village. During the early fifties, the whole area was full of forests. The villagers transformed the area into cultivable land by hard labor and for that a significant number of co-villagers succumbed to unknown diseases. After a lot of suffering, the villagers settled down permanently in Mohmora.
         The name of the second village, Duhutimukh has become popular as it was the source of two streams of the river Jiadhal in Dhemaji sub-division. This was told by Shri Dharmeswar Narah, one of the elderly villagers of Duhutimukh. According to him, in the beginning, the name of the village was Meruk, as the area was full of ashes of burnt out thatch. After that the village was known as mukpi and finally in 1933 the village was renamed as Duhutimukh. Shri Narah informed that the Mishings are known for their migration from one place to another wherever and whenever it is felt necessary. In this case also, the villagers migrated from Majuli to Mashkhowa (near Dhakuakhana, about 25 kms from Duhutimukh) and then to Batua, and finally to the present village. The migration, according to him, took place during the early part of British rule in India.There are controversies among them about their original place. Shri Lamburam Kardong informed that most of the villagers are from Dihingmukh of Sibsagar district. The controversy is natural as the villagers migrated to the present village from different parts of Upper Assam.
          The village Barpamua has the same background of migration as the earlier two villages. Shri Luchon Doley of Barpamua said that few families from Jhanji of Sibsagar district, first migrated temporarily to this village for pam (temporary settlement for cultivation). Later on, they found the place fertile and settled down permanently. Gradually, other co-villagers of the original village followed the former families. According to Shri Doley, he is not sure about the migration, but it was told to him by his grandfather. The migration could have taken place during the Ahom reign in Assam. Almost all the villagers are of the opinion that till 1950, the village was surrounded by deep jungles and chaparies

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