Overview and Concluding Remarks                         Page :72

 
Dr. Jatin
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Dr. Jatin
Mipun's

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In the preceding chapter, we have discussed the process of acculturation, communication and development as visible among the Mishings. Apart from describing this processes, we have tried to examine into their relationship. The above processes have helped in the transformation of the Mishing social structure. Under the impact of these forces, now the Mishings are not 'isolates' . They have lost the basic features of the 'little community'(homogeneity,simplicity,self-sufficiency) as discussed by Redfield. The growing processes of interaction through Hinduism,Vaishnav relegious institutions, Assamese language, communication networks and marketing centres have introduced them the features of 'peasantry'. On the other hand , they are the part of the peasant regional culture and on the other, they are linked with the main stream of the nation through commonly shared mythology, increasing polyglotism and growing inter-regional contacts through railways, markets and migration.
  The North-East India is full of diversities as visible in tribes, languages and dialects, customs and traditions. The different communities are not at the equal level of material and non-material development . A few sociologists  have to tried probe into the development of the tribes of this region by using the common models of social change in India, viz., Sankskritisation, westernisation and development(Dubey: 1972a;1976b;1978d). It is found that the rate of literary and educational development is comparatively higher in those tribes who were later converted to Christianity and less among those who profess Hinduism along with their tribal rituals(Dubey:1972b). The tribal groups, as stated by Ghurye(1963), are the worst sufferer of assimilational stresses and strains. In the context of these discussions, it can be said that the Mishings of Assam are in the second group who have been professing Hinduism along with their primitive customs and traditions . As shown  by earlier studies (Doley:1973;Bhandari:1974;Sharma Thakur:1976;Mipun:1977),  the process of development among the Mishings has been relatively mainly due to socio-cultural factors.
             The main aim of discussion of the present study is on the following points:
              (1) What is the impact of Hinduism in the process of acculturation of the Mishings? To what extent change has occurred in religion,food habits,language,housing pattern,dress and tools and implements of the Mishings?
              (2) What is the nature,form and the impact of communication in general in the Mishing populated area?
              (3) To what extent, acculturation and communication have influenced the socio-economic development of the Mishings?
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       The impact of Hinduism which is the main source of acculturation among the Mishings is found in all aspects of their life. In similar situation ;Vidyarthi(1967) has tried to analyse the relationship between traditions of the dominant regional society and Hinduism.In the present context,the Hinduised Assamese peasantry is the dominant group in the Brahmaputra Valley and the impact of its culture and traditions is visible among the Mishings.
          It is found that the primitive religious practices of the Mishings have changed to a great extent. The resemblance of religious activities of the Mishings with their parent culture of Arunachal Pradesh is diminishing gradually.Due to the adoption of Hinduism as their religion, three distinct features are found among them. Firstly, their religion now-a-days is known as Kewalia,Kalhanghati, or Nisamalia in place of the nameless animist belief and practices.Secondly, there is the emergence of bhakats and hatulas who replaced the


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